Ep #188 Rimu Bhooi – Green candidate for Hamilton East

Kelli from the Tron is a Free FM radio show and podcast made especially for people living in Kirikiriroa Hamilton. Each week I share local news, views, events and music.

🎼🎸Song 1 – I started the podcast with ‘Ocean Baby’ from Summer Thieves who were awesome on Raglan Roast Live recently (watch it here). They’re kicking off their ‘Bandaids and Lipstick’ tour from the Yot Club on the 17th July. More here.

Pitopito korero

Hamilton City Council – Te Kaunihera o Kirikriroa (HCC) are reviewing the voting system we use to elect our mayor and councillors in August. Head to yourcityelections.co.nz to read more about the pros and cons of First Past the Post (FPP) and Single Transferable Voting (STV). Or – fast forward to signing this petition for better representation 👉 https://our.actionstation.org.nz/petitions/vote-stv-for-hamilton

HCC have released a report they commissioned alongside Waikato-Tainui, “Historical report on Hamilton Street and City Names” by Dr Vincent O’Malley Read the report here.

The latest episode of William Ray’s Black Sheep. “The story of statues” Listen to the podcast

🎼🎸Song 2 – ‘Fall into you’ by Looking for Alaska (you should check out their merch here).

🎤Interview with Rimu Bhooi – Green candidate for Hamilton East

Rimu is an activist, uni student and the Green party candidate for Hamilton East. She talked about the experience of students during lockdown, representation, fighting for human rights and her positions on both referendum questions.

Listen to the interview via podcast 👉 (🎧 10_July_podcast)

Last week

I was joined by Looking for Alaska‘s Amy and Aaron to talk about the release of “Fall into you” from their upcoming album (due for release November). Listen to last week’s podcast 👉 (🎧03-07-20 podcast)

One more thing; If you want to support this show, and other independent community media from Free FM in the Waikato – consider becoming a Patreon. The money helps maintain the studios, provide training and get this content to it’s national and international audiences https://www.patreon.com/freefm89

Ep #187 Looking for Alaska

Kelli from the Tron is a Free FM radio show and podcast made especially for people living in Kirikiriroa Hamilton. Each week I share local news, views, events and music.

A new episode broadcasts live on Free FM at 10am every Friday with the podcast available shortly after on Spotify / iHeartRadio / Apple podcasts or accessmedia.nz

Last week

Dr Gaurav Sharma – Hamilton West candidate for the Labour party joined me in the studio to share his background in medicine and business and why politics is the natural progression; what it was like to be on the frontline (as a GP) during covid19 and his priorities for primary health. Listen from 9min 👉 (🎧26-06-20 podcast)

Pitopito korero

Hamilton City Council / Te Kaunihera o Kirikiriroa wants you to have your say on the voting system we use to elect our mayor and councillors. First Past the Post (FPP) or Single Transferable Voting (STV). The yourcityelections website is a great place to educate yourself on the pros and cons of both. I support the change to STV because I think we will have a better say in the make up of the elected council. The only benefit of FPP is that its easy. If you support a change, make sure you have your say in the poll, AND sign the Politics in the Tron petition. If you’re feeling particularly supportive – please consider making a written or verbal submission.

Sign the petition 👉 https://our.actionstation.org.nz/petitions/vote-stv-for-hamilton

Despite the Waikato Regional Council and Waikato Tainui criticising Watercare’s management of infrastructure in Auckland – they are set to allow Auckland to increase their water take from the Waikato River – at least as an short term solution. The latest update.

Last week the Hamilton City Council released an historical account by Dr Vincent O’Malley into the historical figures for which our city and streets are named.  Hamilton, Grey, Bryce and Von Tempsky.  This report seeks to inform on the facts of history, to help navigate a way forward in how we deal with our difficult history.  Read the report here.

Yesterday the infamous in Kirikiriroa Mem drive was demolished, despite a campaign to save it as a part of our cultural artistic history.  Sad day for those who inhabited it, and for those who were a part of its history.  Read more. Speaking of arts – Skinroom in Frankton has been repurposed and rebranded as Never project space. Read more

🎼🎸New music

“Fall into you” by Looking for Alaska

‘Fall Into You’ is the first single from their upcoming album ‘Light and Shadow,’ which is due for release this November. Check out the video which dropped yesterday too.

🎤Interview with Amy and Aaron from Looking for Alaska

Like two weary vagabonds hitch-hiking along the open road with nothing but a guitar and a suitcase of songs and wayward memories, pop-folk duo Looking For Alaska are ready to set the music scene alight. Members Aaron Gott and Amy Maynard offer up a sound rooted in country-style guitar and soaring harmonies woven together at their very fiber, intensified by their on-stage chemistry.

Listen to the interview via podcast 👉 (🎧03-07-20 podcast)

Next week

Rimu Bhooi – Hamilton East candidate for the Green party will be in the Free FM studio to talk about her candidacy and the issues she’d like to hear talked about ahead of this year’s election on September 19th.

One more thing; If you want to support this show, and other independent community media from Free FM in the Waikato – consider becoming a Patreon. The money helps maintain the studios, provide training and get this content to it’s national and international audiences https://www.patreon.com/freefm89

Podcast: Is it time for Aotearoa to become a republic? 🎧

In the first Kelli from the Tron podcast for 2020, I ask the question “Is it time for Aotearoa to become a republic?” (79% of you had said Yes in the poll on my facebook page).

To find out more I spoke to Lewis Holden, the campaign chair for New Zealand Republic to ask what our current constitutional arrangement is, who (according to the polls) support replacing the English monarchy with a New Zealand citizen and the pros and cons of doing so. We talk about how it might impact on Te Tiriti o Waitangi and finally the steps we need to take if we want this to happen. Have a listen, and head to http://www.republic.org.nz/ for more info or if you want to get involved in the campaign.

Then, I talk to Hamilton based indie folk duo Lhasa (Micaela and Sam). 🎤 🎼 They met studying music at Vision College but are now on a North Island tour which includes Nivara Lounge on the 22nd of January). (You’ll also see them at Parachute this year).

Listen to the podcast, and get in touch via social media if you have comments or questions 🙂  🎧 http://bit.do/KFTT-Spotify 

Episode 159 – Two new councillors on their first month on the job

Listen to the Podcast http://bit.do/ep-159

Councillors Jen Nickel (Waikato Regional) and Sarah Thomson (Hamilton City) in the Free FM studio

It’s been just over a month since the election which saw both Jennifer Nickel and Sarah Thomson elected to council for the first time. I invited them into the Free FM studio (in what we hope is a regular thing) to hear about how they’ve found the first month on the job… what’s induction like and what roles have they been given?

Jen is chair of the Climate action committee at the Waikato Regional Council and Sarah is deputy of the Environment committee at Hamilton City Council. These are both new committees – set up due to calls during the election for these issues to be a priority. They talk about the opportunities to work together and what is on the cards for 2020.

Listen to my interview with Jennifer during the election period here or my interview with Sarah on Free Choice here if you want to know more about their background and priorities if elected.

Listen to the Podcast http://bit.do/ep-159

Episode #158 – Day of climate action

Latest Free FM podcast – also available on Spotify / Apple Podcasts

Hannah Huggan is a local climate activist who I met in July after she (and other students) presented to Hamilton City Council on why they should declare a climate emergency. The HCC decided they knew better, and didn’t – but it hasn’t deterred Hannah and other Student Enviroleaders from mobilising both other students and Hamiltonians to take action on climate, through climate strikes and next in a Day of Climate Action.

We talked about why she is motivated to ‘do something’ about our climate emergency; the actions she’s been involved in to date – and what next…

Here’s a message from Student Enviroleaders about the Day of Action!

In this podcast I share some NEW tracks – “Take me from here” from Rubita from her upcoming album “Distinctive Thrill” and “Kanikani kiwi” a track off the new album “Awa” by Maciek Hrybowicz. #localmusic

I also share “Green Room Scuffle” – a cover of a Glass Shards song, by Camoria – whose album I’m calling “Best album from the Tron in 2019”. Just saying… have a listen if you don’t believe me. #localmusic

Jake and Tess are Camoria!

Finally, I wrap up some upcoming events;

Kids Eco Festival – Waipa / Timmy Dee’s Birthday Bash! / Hamilton Crown Lynn Market / Music Swap Market / White Ribbon Hikoi Hamilton

Thanks for listening!! Latest Free FM podcast – also available on Spotify / Apple Podcasts

The youth, gender and climate quake hits Hamilton

First published in the Hamilton News on 18 October 2019

Well if that wasn’t a disruption to the status quo I don’t know what is.  With such a big shake up to our elected council let’s look at the winners and losers.  To start with, the winners were women and those who wanted a better gender balance around the council table.  Regular readers will know this is something I’ve been working behind the scenes on for over a year, so it’s been hugely satisfying for that mahi to come to fruition.  In 2016 we had eight female candidates stand for council with only three elected.  Fast forward to 2019 – there were sixteen women campaigning and six (possibly seven) elected.  That’s phenomenal.  A mihi to the YWCA of Hamilton who did some great work in that space too.  The millenials are celebrating!  In 2016 we had no councillors under 35, and now we have two (possibly three).  I was fortunate to have been involved with Seed Waikato who have championed the work to support candidates and get more people enrolled to vote – ka pai to mahi e hoa maa.  The decreased average age of the council is great for representation and advocacy for issues young people care about.  Another winner was the environment and those pushing hard for climate action.  This is a far more progressive council than we’ve seen in the past with many campaigning for cycleways, restorative planting / green spaces and public transport.  Finally, democracy wins.  Yes our voter turnout is still far too low, but a 5% increase, and being the highest since 2004 is certainly something to celebrate.  The losers? I’ll keep it short.  The candidates who pushed for keeping rates down with no other platforms or vision…  Climate change deniers, racists and anti-vaxxers.  This election result is off the chart!  Thank you Hamilton.

The election results – in short

Well that’s a wrap. Another election pretty much done and dusted and thankfully without the huge disappointment experienced in 2016 – in terms of participation and diversity.

If you haven’t been keeping up… Paula Southgate is our new Mayor elect beating incumbent Andrew King. She’ll be joined in the council chamber by…

East Ward
Mark Bunting
Kesh Naidoo-Rauf
Maxine van Oosten
Margaret Forsyth
Ryan Hamilton
Rob Pascoe

West Ward
Angela O’Leary
Martin Gallagher
Geoff Taylor
Sarah Thomson
Dave Macpherson
Ewan Wilson

Those following the voter returns for the weeks leading to election day know we were tracking to beat turnout for 2016 and 2013, and with special votes still to be counted we’re at 38.78% a 5 % increase. The highest turnout since 2004. Still painfully low but an encouraging increase nonetheless.

I’m celebrating – improved gender balance in our elected council, going from three women to six.

I’m celebrating because in 2016, none of our councillors were under 40, this time we have two – and an overall younger council.

I’m celebrating – councillors elected who advocated for the environment, climate action and cycleways.

I’m celebrating because we unseated four incumbents, which is basically unheard of – we traditionally like the status quo. Consequently we got rid of climate change deniers / racists and an anti-vaxxer.

We get the final final final results on Thursday – I’ll post again then. I’m still keeping my fingers crossed for Louise Hutt to take the sixth seat for the West.

Using local government to get what you want – start by voting

Ae, e hoa. This is another opinion piece encouraging you to vote in the local elections. But, stick around – I’m not going to tell you to vote because it’s ‘your civic duty‘ or because people have literally – literally, died for this democratic right. I’m not going to use those reasons because to be honest, they didn’t work for me.

This is me voting… super easy!

I’m also not going to tell you to vote because what local government does impacts on our day to day life; from clean water to your tap, how you get around the city, the parks and community facilities in your neighbourhood to how much your rates bill is as a result.

FInally, I’m not going to pretend that the sky will fall in if certain people are elected, or not elected. We elect a mayor and twelve councillors across the city, who have equal votes – so by nature of it – nothing drastic will happen because they need a majority. In fact, local government is painfully slow and conservative – probably more due to the ties and requirements of central government than anything else- but it means ‘things tick by’ regardless of who we vote for.

So, why bother? Well, I bother – by way of voting last week, and spending the last three years committed to sharing information and encouragement to you via Politics in the Tron because I’m rethinking the role of local government and how we use it to get what we want. I want you to join me in this movement.

I want us to use local government to get more for our city. How so? Vote for the candidates who are talking about the issues you care about. Then, stick with them… support those candidates / elected councillors to get those issues across the line with their peers. Here’s an easy example…

We all care about the climate emergency right? (Okay, so we have at least three Hamilton City Councillors who still don’t get it – so I’ll rephrase). Most of us care about the climate emergency and damage to papatuuaanuku. We know that one of the biggest things we can do (right after having one less kid) is to address our obsession with cars. At a getting around town level, this inevitably leads to cycle-ways.

Choose candidates who bang on about cycleways. Easy. You wouldn’t choose a candidate who continually talks about ‘loving their car’ because they are clearly stuck in 2005 and aren’t looking to what our climate / environment needs; and aren’t considering the impact of congestion as our population grows, or heck even our increasing obesity rates which require us to get more active.

After finding out which candidates care about that issue; vote for them. Then, keep an eye on the local news, heck be proactive and message them and ask them to keep you (in fact all residents) up to date with when decisions are being made about cycleways. (I think Councillors are really bad at asking us for support on issues sometimes, but this might change if enough of us try to change things).

Funding decisions are usually during the 10 year plan or annual plan but you’d be surprised how often it pops up during the rest of the term. Once you know a decision is about to be made, get involved. Ask the councillor what they need and mobilise others to support you.

Look, I’m not so completely out of touch, that I think everyone has the time or inclination to get involved in these sorts of decisions, what I’m trying to highlight is that we can get more of what we want, and less of what we don’t – if we choose candidates who look or sound like us, and if we pay attention to the issues we care about throughout the three year term.

This includes, asking questions – or ‘holding the buggers to account’ if they vote differently to what they said they would. Accountability is a huge part of a better system.

So, this was a longer post than I expected – and I may not have articulated it well, but what I’m trying to say is – we can get more for the city we love if we choose the candidates who ‘care about what we care about’ and support them once elected. We need less of the ‘us and them’.

If you don’t like ‘them’… don’t vote for them … vote for someone else. There are a heap of new candidates standing this year who deserve your vote.

If that envelope is still on your kitchen table – here are some links to help you choose and vote.

🧐 Information on candidates www.politicsinthetron.co.nz
📫 Post/ballot boxes https://www.yourcityelections.co.nz/vote

If the voting papers didn’t turn up call the Electoral office on ☎ 0800 922 822. (Tell your boss you have permission from us to make the call on work time). #votethetron

Core council business, wellbeing

In 2019, legislation was passed which put the people back into council business.  Until then, we’d become familiar with hearing council’s role was pipes, roads and rubbish.  Local government must now “promote the social, economic, environmental, and cultural well-being of communities”.  That might mean more funding for arts, or community organisations.  It might mean making sure any decisions made consider the four well-beings.  Regardless, I wanted to highlight an issue that is important for youth and how council has a role to play in addressing it. 

If you ask young people what is important to them, climate and mental health will be at the top of the list.  So, what role does our city council play in addressing mental health?  It’s here that we consider the second of the two options outlined above, no-one is suggesting council fund mental health initiatives, but they can make sure that all decisions made consider what we know to be good for mental health.  That means make sure that we protect and restore green spaces and make getting around the city safer and easierNature and physical activity are good for mental health.  Councils can support community wellbeing by funding and promoting community work, events and organisations. Connectivity, a sense of belonging and identity are good for mental health.  Finally, affordable housing – can be enabled by council by coming up with innovative solutions like the community land trust, or making sure developers offer “affordable” options.  Financial pressure impacts on mental health. Council has a role to play in promoting wellbeing, I hope that we use this election to make sure that candidates know that this is a priority for not just youth, but all of us.    

Getting out to vote: Youth and the 2019 local elections

I was recently on the panel of “Getting out to vote: Youth and the 2019 local elections” hosted by the University of Waikato). If you missed it, here’s the script I was supposed to stick to…

Hannah Huggan / Candra Pullon / Chloe Swarbrick / Me / Tomairangai McRae

We’ve been asked what the political priorities for youth are in this year’s local election.  I could give you a long list of what I think the issues facing Hamilton are but it feels a bit wrong me telling you what you what ‘the priorities are’ or what you should care about.  We’re all different, and what you want for the city will be different to what I want.  So I’m going to focus on what we can do to improve participation to give more people a voice to say what they want for themselves. But then I’m going to talk about how local government can play a role improving mental health to show how councils could be relevant.  

In October 2016 –the voter turnout in Hamilton went from 38 to 34% the lowest of all cities in NZ.  We saw the election of 12 councillors and a Mayor who looked nothing like the majority of Hamiltonians, certainly not me.  There’s nothing wrong with the make up of our current council if you are a male, over 50 with a Eurocentric viewpoint – but like I said that isn’t most of us so it is a problem.  No councillors under 40.  No Maori or Pasifika.  Only three women.  Many were long term politicians or professionals so far removed from trying to live on the $20-30,000 per year many young people live on. 

It’s a problem because even with the best of their intentions they won’t represent as well as we could ourselves.  We have different viewpoints on the purpose of life, what’s best for our family, how we want to live and what’s important to us.  That’s the crux of why we need as many people as possible influencing decision making through voting every three years and participating at any opportunity along the way.  It’s time they made that easier.

As a result of that low turnout and lack of diversity I founded Politics in the Tron a way to get more people political – by informing Hamiltonians about the issues and players in council; providing a hub for discussion and encouraging participation.   Ultimately it comes from a place of loving Hamilton but recognising it would be even better if more of us were involved in shaping it.  

But I and Politics in the Tron are just one cog in the wheel.  To increase engagement, we need to support the candidates putting their hand up, they will rouse the public’s interest and inspire us to get involved and vote.  We’ve seen that with youth and with women in this election so far.  We can also mobilise based on issues – like climate. 

The student enviroleaders and you’ll hear from Hannah soon, are a really great example, of a group who identified an issue, learnt about council processes, found communities to support the issue – and followed the slow process through.  

Unfortunately it also highlighted examples of what happens when young people do take concerns to councillors who are older – we heard patronising comments who called our leaders kids, used words like hysterical, brainwashed – but even worse, a comment along the lines of ‘well done for participating’ but ‘we know better and aren’t going to give you what you asked for’.  What I would like to know is if over 1000 businessmen signed a petition, filled the gallery and presented compelling reasons why this decision is best for the majority – would councillors have agreed and voted for what they were asking?  Time for a change I think.

If the average age of a Hamiltonian is 32, I think it’s time we saw the average age of elected members drop this year there’s no lack of credible candidates.  Head to Seed Waikato’s website for more information about those candidates specifically.

When I think about what is important to us – politics aside – two things stand out Climate change and mental health.  Councils need to a better job at showing us how decisions made impact on the issues we care about.

Most councillors would probably say mental health is a role for central government but physical health, housing affordability, sense of belonging and connection all impact on mental health and are all decisions that run past a councillor.  As I go through them briefly now I hope that it might help to show that local government can be relevant and it is worth voting.

I don’t know about you but when I’m active, walking and biking around – I feel good.  We know physical activity is good for our well-being so it makes sense to make sure that Hamilton has good, consistent, safe cycleways, footpaths and green spaces.  Making it easier and safer to exercise is good for mental health.

For good mental health we also want to feel connected with our communities however we choose to define them; connecting is easier when the hubs like community organisations or neighbourhood houses are well supported, like the new pan pasifika hub being built for our city – a great decision.  Community organisations play a crucial role in bringing people together enabling information sharing and looking after the isolated or the most vulnerable. Connection and belonging is good for our mental health.

Arts and culture are good for our mental health.  Your jam might be visual arts, theatre, dance, or music.  But here’s an example of what happens when your councillors are old and out of touch…  The decision to buy and demolish Victoria street buildings might have seemed like a great idea to a council who wanted to make the Victoria on the River park bigger – but what they failed to do is realise that one of those buildings included Nivara Lounge, which is arguably the most important live music venue in our city today.  It not only provides an inclusive venue for live musicians to perform, but also provides a space for members of our community to come together each month – for Sunday jazz, comedy clubs, hip hop nights etc. etc.  So while Nivara Lounge isn’t funded by council – the council make decisions which impact on the ability of venues like this to exist.  Music and arts are good for our mental health – so we need a council that understands the local scene.   

When you bring up affordable housing many – usually the rates control waka will tell you it’s a central govt thing – completely ignoring what is in council’s power to do and what might be best done locally. For example, the council have recently voted to put $2 million into a community land trust –so there will be houses available in Hamilton which has the land value taken out of the cost.  When a developer comes to council with a plan, council can specify how much of their development project has to be “affordable” housing – while that’s a loose word on the free market, it does provide an opportunity for slightly cheaper than average houses to be on the market.  Councils can do more to create affordable housing options by changing the district plan so that we see high rise apartments.  Cost of living is impacting on our mental health. Councils need supported to try as many tools as possible to address that.

I’ve shared some ideas today on how decisions council make every day impact on the city we live in, and that if we want a higher youth turnout they and we need to do a better job at making what councils do relatable.   

We’re looking at priorities for youth in the upcoming election, I think we should focus on  informing and encouraging people to participate and I know that if we can relate everything council does to mental health and climate that we will see that youthquake we’re all after.  We need help growing Politics in the Tron so that we all get more political in a space that is comfortable – so join me www.politicsinthetron.co.nz.